Frequently Asked Questions

What is Arthroscopy?

Arthroscopy or Keyhole surgery is a surgical procedure during which the internal structure of a joint is examined for diagnosis and treatment of problems inside the joint.

What conditions are treated with arthroscopic surgery?

Arthroscopic examination of joints is helpful in diagnosis and treatment of the following conditions:

  • Inflammation: Synovitis, the inflammation of the lining of the knee, shoulder, elbow, wrist, or ankle.
  • Acute or chronic injury: Injuries to the shoulder, knee and wrist joint such as cartilage tears, tendon tears, carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Osteoarthritis: A type of arthritis caused by cartilage loss in a joint.
  • Removal of loose bodies of bone or cartilage that becomes logged within the joint.

How is arthroscopy performed?

During arthroscopic surgery, a general, spinal, or a local anaesthesia will be given depending on the condition. A small incision of the size of a buttonhole is made through which the arthroscope is inserted. Other accessory incisions will be made through which specially designed instruments are inserted. After the procedure is completed, arthroscope is removed and incisions are closed.

What are the possible complications associated with arthroscopy?

Some of the possible complications after arthroscopy include infection, phlebitis (clotting of blood in vein), excessive swelling, bleeding, blood vessel, or nerve damage and instrument breakage.

What is the recovery process after arthroscopic surgery?

It may take several weeks for the puncture wounds to heal and the joint to recover completely. A rehabilitation program may be advised for a speedy recovery of normal joint function. You can resume normal activities and go back to work within a few days. You may be instructed about the incision care, activities to be avoided, and exercises to be performed for faster recovery.

Will physical therapy be required after surgery?

Getting a full range of motion, strength, and flexibility back after surgery usually takes time. That is where pre­operative exercise, education, and post­operative physical therapy programs come in – to ensure you are physically and emotionally prepared for surgery and to maximize your recovery after surgery.

Revision Knee Replacement

This means that complete or a part of your previous knee replacement needs to be revised. This operation varies from a very minor adjustment to a massive operation replacing significant amount of bone and hence is difficult to describe in full.

Uni condylar Knee Replacement

This simply means that only a part of the knee joint is replaced through a smaller incision than would normally be used for a total knee replacement. The knee joint is made up of 3 compartments, the patellofemoral and medial and lateral compartments between the femur and tibia (i.e. the long bones of the leg). Often only one of these compartments wears out, usually the medial one. If you have symptoms and X-ray findings suggestive of this then you may be suitable for this procedure.

Anterior Cruciate Ligament ACL Reconstruction

The anterior cruciate ligament is one of the major stabilizing ligaments in the knee. It is a strong rope like structure located in the center of the knee running from the femur to the tibia. When this ligament tears unfortunately, it does not heal and often leads to the feeling of instability in the knee.
ACL reconstruction is a commonly performed surgical procedure and with recent advances in arthroscopic surgery can now be performed with minimal incision and low complication rates

Total Knee Replacement (TKR)

A total knee replacement (TKR) or total knee arthroplasty is a surgery that resurfaces arthritic knee joint with an artificial metal or plastic replacement parts called the ‘prostheses’.

Arthroscopy of the Knee Joint

Arthroscopy is a surgical procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into a joint. Arthroscopy is a term that comes from two Greek words, arthro-, meaning joint, and -skopein, meaning to examine.

The benefits of arthroscopy involve smaller incisions, faster healing, a more rapid recovery, and less scarring. Arthroscopic surgical procedures are often performed on an outpatient basis and the patient is able to return home on the same day.

Revision Hip Replacement

This maybe because complete or a part of your previous hip replacement needs to be revised. This operation varies from a minor adjustment to a massive operation replacing significant amount of bone and hence is difficult to describe in full.

Hip Resurfacing

Hip Resurfacing or bone conserving procedure replaces the acetabulum (hip socket) and resurfaces the femoral head. This means the femoral head has some or very little bone removed and replaced with the metal component. This spares the femoral canal.

Total Hip Replacement (THR)

Total Hip Replacement (THR) procedure replaces total or part of the hip joint with an artificial device (prosthesis) to alleviate pain and restore joint movement.

Femoro Acetabular Impingement FAI

Femoroacetabular Impingement FAI is a condition resulting from abnormal pressure and friction between the ball and socket of the hip joint resulting in pain and progressive hip dysfunction. This when left untreated leads to the development of secondary osteoarthritis of the hip.

Hip Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopy is a relatively new surgical technique that can be effectively employed to treat a variety of hip conditions.

What should I bring with me when I come for an appointment?

When you come for your appointment remember to bring the following:

  • Driver’s License or a valid ID
  • Insurance information
  • Referral Letter (if required)
  • Reports, X­rays, MRI’s, CT scans etc. and any other relevant information